March 17th, 1pm: Dr Alp Kantarci, Forsyth Institute, University of Boston, USA
TITLE: to be announced

LINK: https://eu.bbcollab.com/guest/762de67e3dd941adb83f392fcb941ada

SUMMARY: The underlying theme in much of Alps research is inflammation—a connecting factor between oral disease and systemic diseases. Specifically, Kantarci investigates the molecular mechanisms and resolution pathways of inflammation in patients with periodontal disease and how systemic diseases are connected with periodontal disease. Since inflammation is the basis of many diseases in the human body, emphasis in Kantarci’s lab is placed on understanding the role of various conditions that affect the immune and inflammatory responses by the host to microbes. Recent work from the Kantarci laboratory is focused on the link between Alzheimer’s disease and periodontal disease.https://www.forsyth.org/scientists/alpdogan-kantarci/

April 21st- Date to be finalised; Dr Michelle Visser, Dept Oral Biology, SUNY@Buffalo, USA

LINK: https://eu.bbcollab.com/guest/857dfd006003462fb2a03a9bd9f9d2

TITLE: to be announced

Michelles laboratory focuses on determining how T. denticola and other spirochetes remain “under the radar” in oral disease biofilms to evade the normally protective neutrophil response and impair associated key cellular processes such as directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and actin dynamics.
http://dental.buffalo.edu/departments/oral-biology/academics-and-training/oral-biology-phd/faculty-mentors/michelle-visser-research.html

June 16th- Human mouse oral microbiome; Dr Susan Joseph, Kings College, London, UK

Susan completed an MRes in Applied Biosciences (2008) and PhD (2013) in Molecular Microbiology from Nottingham Trent University. Her doctoral thesis focussed on the development of a genus-wide MLST scheme and whole-genome analysis of the neonatal pathogen, Cronobacter. After a postdoctoral position at New York University working on the environmental microbiome of NYC, she joined the Curtis lab at QMUL in 2016, with the subsequent move to King’s College.

Her major research interests lie in understanding how microbial communities interact with each other and their host in a specific ecological niche while also selectively transforming into an infectious cohort during disease. Her current research is based on the role of the oral microbiome in the development of disease and maintenance of health, primarily working with mouse models of dysbiosis and periodontal disease.

LINK: https://eu.bbcollab.com/guest/bfcaf237296744c3a8b3f8ca381b11e8